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M20 

M20  - Trifid Nebula in Sagittarius

This huge swath of sky was imaged by Tracy Tuttle (Kansas State University) with a Tele Vue 102 Apo, and an ST-8300 through LRGB filters. The Trifid nebula is called that because of the three distinct sections in the central core of the emission nebula. That part can be seen with the naked eye. What cannot be seen with the naked eye is the Trifid's wonderful detail of both emission and reflection nebulae. The red glow of ionized Hydrogen is the very distinctive emission. The blue is reflected light from the 7.31 magnitude, B9IV type star, SAO 186149, roughly centered in the refection portion. The open cluster M21 is above and to the right in this incredible star field.



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*Unless otherwise noted all images are from the STScI Digitized Sky Survey.

This page updated: 07/05/14 09:22:12 AM


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